September 30: Sherman Alexie

September 30: Sherman Alexie's "The Absolutely True Story of a Part-Time Indian" | Banned Books Week | Daily Literary Quotes at Literary Cobblestones
September 30: Sherman Alexie’s “The Absolutely True Story of a Part-Time Indian” | Banned Books Week | Daily Literary Quotes at Literary Cobblestones

Hello Cobblers!

We’re finishing up our second month as the entity that is Literary Cobblestones, so I decided to celebrate by making today a Banned Books Week commemoration. Who better to feature for this event than the king of banned books — Sherman Alexie.

This year’s Banned Books Week began on the 27th and will continue through the 3rd of October. To learn more about the history of this week, check out the official website, “Celebrating the Freedom to Read: Sept. 27 – Oct. 3, 2015“, or the American Library Association’s site, “Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to Read.

I chose my own personal favorite Alexie novel for this post because, well, I’m the administrator. 🙂 Plus, “The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian” was originally published on Sept. 12, 2007, so it deserves a shoutout before the month’s  over. This novel also marks my own introduction to Alexie when I took a Young Adult Literature course a few years ago. I had never read anything like it before; his style is as close to original as anyone will ever be. If you haven’t read it, do it today by purchasing it from Alexie’s site: “Sherman Alexie.”

Oh, it has also been on the Banned Books list since 2010. To see more banned books, check out the ALA’s “Frequently Challenged Books” list.

I will see you next month.

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September 29: Miguel de Cervantes

September 29: The birth of Miguel de Cervantes | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones
September 29: The birth of Miguel de Cervantes | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones

Hello Cobblers!

If you’re reading this, you’ve survived Monday. Let’s celebrate your success with the wise words of Miguel de Cervantes, whose birthday we are also celebrating.

I was slightly underwhelmed by the lack of links I’ve found for Cervantes; he’s held as a literary genius, so where are all the features? Maybe I was just looking in the wrong places.

Here we have an extended biography, as well as access to some of his works from the Cervantes Project: “Miguel de Cervantes (1957-1616): Life and Portrait.”

I also found a scholarly look at the importance of Cervantes’ “Don Quixote” from a historical criticism perspective. It’s published on Columbia College’s site and written by Dr. Alison Krueger: “Historical Context for Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes.”

To finish out our list, I was able to find one feature from NPR regarding the location Cervantes requested to be buried: “The Reason Cervantes Asked to be Buried Under a Convent.”

That is all for today.

September 28: Arthur Miller

September 28: The creative genius of Arthur Miller | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones
September 28: The creative genius of Arthur Miller | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones

Hello Cobblers!

Oh, the dreaded Monday is upon us, but we will wander forth in search of a better tomorrow, or something like that. To assist in your survival until tomorrow shows up, here’s some Arthur Miller.

Speaking in terms of literary history, Arthur Miller holds no significance on September 28th. I had an open spot and decided to fill it with one of the greatest playwrights that has ever blessed us with his presence. Also, we will be celebrating Miller again in October, and I already have an over-abundance of hyperlink choices, so it’s helpful to spread them out a bit. Shall we? Yes, we shall.

For an extended biography on Miller from the National Endowment of the Humanities, as well as a list of his awards and honors: “Arthur Miller Biography.

For today’s curation, I don’t have any feature articles, but I do have two interviews:

From The New Yorker, “Walking with Arthur Miller,”

and from The Paris Review, “Arthur Miller, The Art of Theater No. 2.”

Remember: Monday’s never more than 23 hours and 59 minutes from being over ;).

September 27: Irvine Welsh

September 27: The birth of Irvine Welsh | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones
September 27: The birth of Irvine Welsh | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones

Hello Cobblers!

It once again time for the Sunday sadness, as Monday is quickly approaching. To ease your pain, let’s celebrate the birth of author Irvine Welsh.

Welsh published “Trainspotting” in 1993, and I was not a cool future-hipster five-year-old who read such masterpieces. Naturally, I came to Welsh in my late teens with the film adaptation to his acclaimed novel, and then obsessively re-watched the DVD until it was scratched past functionality. I prefer to go from written word to screen, but Welsh is so talented that any exposure to his creative genius is acceptable in my rule-book.

That’s enough rambles, so let’s get on with it.

First up, I have chosen a print interview from The Telegraph: “Irvine Welsh Interview.” Welsh is honest to the point of being brutal, which is also a staple of his writing style.

New to the digital curations of Lit. Cobb., a Reddit AMA (“Ask me anything” for those too cool for the Reddit scene): “AMA: Irvine Welsh.

Lastly, a video interview-ish clip from Big Think: “Irvine Welsh on Drugs.

September 26: T.S. Eliot

September 26: The birth of T.S. Eliot | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones
September 26: The birth of T.S. Eliot | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones

Hello Cobblers!

How’s the weekend treating you? Hopefully it extends outside of Netflix and coffee…Just kidding — ride that caffeine high through all five seasons of “The Walking Dead.” If you need to pretend that such a binge didn’t happen this weekend, then here’s some slightly educational, as well as entertaining, items to impress your co-workers come Monday.

First off, let’s send our birthday greetings to good ‘ol T.S. Eliot, wherever he may be. And what better way to show him our appreciate than some feature articles.

One of my all time favorite publications, The New Yorker, has a feature on Eliot and his friendship with Groucho Marx: “The Fraught Friendship of T.S. Eliot and Groucho Marx.

The Atlantic published an article, which has since stolen my heart:”When T.S. Eliot Invented the Hipster.

There has been only one other time since the beginning of time, aka August 1st, that I have featured a literary app. Touch Press has released an app for “The Waste Land” by Eliot. The app takes Eliot’s poem and makes it interactive with audio readings, detailed notes, interviews, performances, etc. It isn’t free, but I didn’t expect it to be with as much work and creative effort that went into the project. I suggest checking out the site to get a preview of its features before purchasing: “The Waste Land App.”

Okay, go back to your Netflix binge.

September 25: William Faulkner

September 25: The Birth of William Faulkner (1897) | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones
September 25: The Birth of William Faulkner (1897) | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones

Hello Cobblers!

Not only is today the best day of the week (Friday!), but we also celebrate the birth of beloved Southern novelist William Faulkner. Wills doesn’t need build-up, so let’s jump into today’s collection.

First up, an extended biography of Faulkner on the Nobel Prize’s site. Faulkner won the prestigious award in Literature in 1949: “William Faulkner – Biographical.

For all things Faulkner and to find fellow Faulkner-ers (forgive me, we need to work on a proper fandom name), check out the Faulkner Society: “The William Faulkner Society.

To take you Faulkner-appreciation to a new level, listen to his lectures from 1957 and 1958 from the University of Virginia: “Faulkner at Virginia: An Audio Archive.

Don’t worry, you’re not getting away without some features.

From The New York Times Magazine: “How William Faulkner Tackled Race — and Freed the South From Itself.” Here’s a great line from the feature: “He’s not concerned with holding us in suspense over the unearthing of events but in keeping us transfixed, as he goes about excavating the soil beneath them, and tracing their post-mortem effects (embodied, perhaps, by the worm that comes to light in a shovelful of dirt, ‘doubtless alive when the clod was thrown up though by afternoon it was frozen again’). The nightmare of the Southern past exists — an accomplished thing. To delve into the nature of the tragedy is the novel’s drama.”

And finally, my personal favorite, Faulkner’s interview in The Paris Review: “William Faulkner, The Art of Ficition No. 12.“Here’s an excerpt (one of Faulkner’s answers): “Once he did it, once he matched the work to the image, the dream, nothing would remain but to cut his throat, jump off the other side of that pinnacle of perfection into suicide. I’m a failed poet. Maybe every novelist wants to write poetry first, finds he can’t, and then tries the short story, which is the most demanding form after poetry. And, failing at that, only then does he take up novel writing.

Now that we’ve consumed an appropriate amount of Faulkner, we can start our weekend.

Good day.

September 24: F. Scott Fitzgerald

September 24: The Birth of F. Scott Fitzgerald | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones
September 24: The Birth of F. Scott Fitzgerald | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones

Happy Thursday, Cobblers!

Today we celebrate the birth of the American National Treasure that is F. Scott Fitzgerald.

For an extended biography of Fitzgerald, check out the University of South Carolina’s page: “A brief life of Fitzgerald.

PBS American Masters’ host an excerpt from one of Fitzgerald’s essay: “F.Scott Fitzgerald: Winter Dreams | Essay: The Crack-Up.

Finally, at absolutely no surprise to any regular readers of Literary Cobblestones, we have a feature from The New Yorker: “Living Well is the Best Revenge.

Good day, my friends.

September 23: Oscar Wilde

September 23: Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones
September 23: Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones

Hello Cobblers!

Today is the first day of September that we are not in fact celebrating the birth of an author or a significant publishing date, so I chose to feature one of my favorites: Oscar Wilde. Honestly, I celebrate the birth of Wilde on a daily basis anyway; he’s just got so much attitude that I can never get enough. Today’s quote comes from Wilde’s play “The Importance of Being Earnest“, and this particular line was spoken by the character of Algernon.

Since I’ve already featured Wilde, and I’m sure there will be plenty more features on him, I decided to chose only one article for today, published by The New York Review of Books: “Oscar Wilde, Classics Scholar.” Here’s an excerpt from the article to entice you: “As we know, his prediction would be spectacularly fulfilled: like a character in one of the Greek tragedies he was able to translate so fluently as a student, his short life followed a spectacular trajectory from fame to infamy, from the heady triumphs of his post-Oxford days, when he was already famous enough to be lampooned by Gilbert and Sullivan in Patience, to the dreadful peripeteia of the trials and imprisonment.” 

For previous hyperlink curations for Wilde, check out August’s post: “August 17: Oscar Wilde.

Wilde is the writer to turn to to get out of that mid-week slump.

September 22: J.R.R. Tolkien

September 22: Happy Hobbit Day! | J.R.R.Tolkien | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones
September 22: Happy Hobbit Day! | J.R.R.Tolkien | Daily Literary Quotes @ Literary Cobblestones

Hello Cobblers!

Today is the world celebration of Hobbit Day, the birthday of both Bilbo and Frodo. This is also Tolkien Week, whose history can be explained by the American Tolkien Society: “Hobbit Day and Tolkien Week.

To celebrate Hobbit Day in style, get your free kit from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: “Hobbit Day Event Kit.”

And get more ideas from the Smithsonian: “How to Properly Celebrate a Hobbit Birthday.” This post was originally for Tolkien’s birthday, but the ideas transfer over well.

Although it’s Bilbo and Frodo’s celebration, we can’t leave out their creator, so I’ve also curated some Tolkien hyperlinks.

Our first Tolkien feature is also one of my all time favorite pieces because it focuses on the battle, as well as collaboration, between traditional literature and New Media, with special attention on the coexistence between Tolkien ideology and technology: “Fall, Mortality, and the Machine: Tolkien and Technology.” To convince you to read this article from The Atlantic, I’ve pulled out a line from it: “The idea that technology (“the Machine”) is a kind of magic, or at least deeply related to magic, is one that Tolkien shared with his close friend C.S. Lewis, who argued that, in the early modern period, ‘The serious magical endeavor and teh serious scientific endeavor are twins: one was sickly and died, the other strong and throve.’